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November 21, 2016

We have written before about the importance of temporary works in our blog titled ‘Why Temporary Works are so Important in Construction.’ Where we highlighted the potential nightmare that can unfold when working on a property without having and implementing a proper temporary works plan.

In this blog post we’re going to delve deeper in to what temporary works are, the role they play and how they are best used.

What are temporary works?

The definition of temporary works is very simple, temporary works are the part of the construction project that are needed to build the permanent structure, once the job is finished the temporary works are usually removed. The most common types of temporary works are scaffolds, props and excavation supports.

What are temporary works?

The definition of temporary works is very simple, temporary works are the part of the construction project that are needed to build the permanent structure, once the job is finished the temporary works are usually removed. The most common types of temporary works are scaffolds, props and excavation supports.

Why use temporary works?

There are several reasons as to why temporary works should be used, the first and primary is safety. Temporary works help to ensure that the construction site is safe for both the workers and the public that may be coming into close contact with the site. This can range from the site fencing (also known as hoarding), scaffolding, concrete shutter design to name just a few.

Temporary works have such a broad classification it crosses over various Acts and Regulations, Approved Codes of Practice and Industry Guidance, here are just a few examples:

Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2015
Working at Height Regulations 2005
Lifting Operations & Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998
Provision & Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998
There is a minimum standard for temporary works which was published by the BSI Standard Publication under the ‘Code of Practice for Temporary Works, Procedures and the Permissible Stress Design of Falsework’ which is also known as BS 5975:2008+A 1:2011. This document sets out the minimum standards and procedures for management of temporary works, however this doesn’t mean that a company can’t produce their own providing they meet with these standards.

It is important that temporary works are considered to be an engineered solution, meaning that the use of proper procedure is used to control the risk and provide an economical solution for the client from the very start of the project.

How are temporary works best used?

Proper design and planning of temporary works is crucial; the following procedure is likely to occur:

The client (usually the architect or construction firm) must produce pre-construction information, this will then be passed over to the Principal Designer and Contractor.
It’s then the Principal Designer and Contractors job to outline the works and propose the temporary works required.
The Temporary Works Coordinator (TWC) and the Temporary Works Supervisor (TWS) are then appointed.
The temporary works designs are then created and issued by the Temporary Works Designer (TWD).
The solutions are then checked and the relevant certificates are then issued.
Temporary Works Registers are created.
Permits for loading and or Strikes are issued.
Maintenance records and inspections are carried out.
The temporary works will be constantly reviewed and amended where necessary. The TWC does have the authority to stop works on site if they deem it to be unsafe, this is (understandably) a vital role to ensure maximum safety on site at all times.

Temporary works are the backbone of any construction project whether its an above ground extension, refurbishment or basement conversion, proper planning and design must be done to ensure safety.

Here at GSE we specialise in temporary works design, talk to one of our team today to find out how we can help.